The Creative Way

Where do I even begin?

This month, I took a deep dive into The Creative Way, a storytelling course by my favorite author, Ted Dekker. I was so excited to finally be able to take it as it has been offered once a year for the past two years and I was never able to afford it. This year, however, thanks to my parents and Millie, I was able to sign up and get my books! I am beyond grateful to the support I recieved from my family in taking this course and it has had an invaluable impact on me already.

The big thing about this course that makes it so powerful and unique is that it is not a writing course – it is a storytelling course. It is entirely about the art of story, and not just any story, but what Ted calls transformative fiction. I have long loved his definition of what a good story is, and The Creative Way really pushed me deep into the full meaning of story.

Story is a series of events involving worthy characters who are transformed as a result of those events.

He broke this definition down and specified each part of it even more in the course, but the main focus was on the word Transformed.Read More »

Creating Character Arcs

After finishing two non-fiction books on creative writing – How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy and Characters and Perspectives, which I talked about in this blog post – I moved on to my next book, which I recieved for Christmas.

I was very excited to recieve not one, but three creative writing books:

  • Creative Character Arcs by K. M. Weiland
  • Beginnings, Middles, & Ends by Nancy Kress
  • Song Maps by Simon Hawkins

The first one I decided to read is the one I was most excited about: Creative Character Arcs: The Masterful Author’s Guide to Uniting Story Structure, Plot, and Character Development. I had read excellent reviews about this book, suggesting it was a #1 resource for writers, and it was filing in a gap that I really care about in my writing: character development.

Some of my favorite books are solely because of the character development, the number one being Jumperby Steven Gould. I love the way that the character grows and changes and his balance between coming of age and figuring out his super powers. The angle of anti-terrorism is so interesting, especially the way he tries to balance revenge with morals, and his relationship with the F.B.I. is so interesting. I love it, it fascinates me, and I really want to reflect genuine character development in my writing.

This book seems to be the answer, and I’m certainly adding her companion novel Structuring Your Story to my Must Read List. But, let me get to the book.Read More »

Story in Songs

I’ve mentioned music and how important it is for my writing process before (here and here) and thought I would do a quick little insight into some of the top tracks for my current story [working title: Colors to Stars]. While the Spotify playlist has 90 songs and over 6 hours of delightful music to inspire, there are select ones that really stand out as representing the story.

In terms of tone, “Until We Go Down” by Ruelle makes my imagination go wild with ideas.Read More »